CONFIRMED: North Korea Fires Intercontinental Ballistic Missile Towards Japan Economic Zone

Japan’s Prime Minister’s Office for disaster and crisis management information tweeted shortly after the report: “North Korea launched a missile that has the possibility of arriving in the exclusive economic zone (EEZ) of our country.”
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North Korea fired an unidentified ballistic missile on Wednesday, a U.S. official confirmed to Fox News.

North Korea fired a ballistic missile in its first provocation since U.S. President Donald Trump labeled the country a state sponsor of terrorism earlier this month, Yonhap reported, citing South Korea’s Joint Chiefs of Staff.

The agency didn’t immediately provide more details on the launch. Japan’s coast guard said the missile could fall into the sea near Japan.

https://www.bloomberg.com/api/embed/iframe?id=e1cd6bcb-7d15-42d9-bd72-643ee74544b3

North Korea conducted its sixth and most powerful nuclear test on Sept. 3, and has launched more than a dozen missiles this year as Kim Jong Un’s regime seeks the capability to hit the continental U.S. with a nuclear weapon. The United Nations has imposed stringent sanctions on North Korea for its weapons tests.

Trump on Nov. 20 labeled North Korea a state sponsor of terrorism because of its threats of nuclear devastation and support of terrorist acts including assassinations on foreign soil. North Korea responded by saying the designation reminds the country it should keep hold of its “precious nuclear sword.”

On Nov. 14, the U.S. wrapped up strike force drills in the Western Pacific using three aircraft carriers — the first such exercise in a decade. North Korea routinely complains about U.S. drills in the region, using them as justification to ratchet up its own weapons program.

The launch ends a lull in test activity by the Kim regime. North Korea’s last provocation was on Sept. 15 when it fired a second missile over Japan in as many months. source

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WWIII Fears Sparked As North Korea Fires Nuclear-Capable Missile From Pyongyang Into Japanese Air Space • Now The End Begins

North Korea carried out its sixth and most powerful nuclear test on Sept. 3, worsening already fraught U.S.-North Korea relations. In response, the United Nations Security Council voted to intensify sanctions, including imposing a limit on oil imports, against the hermit state. While the duration and scope of such a conflict would be difficult to measure, North Korea remained an immense risk, Fordham said.
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Japan issued a missile alert to mobile phones and on national television, notifying citizens that a missile may have been launched by North Korea, Bloomberg News reports.

EDITOR’S NOTE: With each passing few weeks, North Korea keeps firing missiles, many of them nuclear capable. President Trump has been showing tremendous restraint, choosing for the time being to use sanctions instead of a military option. But as the missiles continue to fly across Japanese airspace, the military option is growing more and more likely. 

The unidentified missile passed over Japan airspace near Hokkaido on Friday at 7.06 am local time. The missile was fired from North Korea in an eastern direction, according to South Korea military.

The outbreak of military conflict on the Korean Peninsula would be destabilizing and could possibly result in a global war, according to Citi’s top global political analyst.

While it was impossible to put a number on the scale of the North Korea risk, war games carried out through history have simulated what could happen as a result, said Tina Fordham, managing director and chief global analyst at Citi.

“A conflict on the Korean Peninsula would not only be very disruptive in the region, but could potentially lead to World War III because of the U.S. security guarantee, so it would be internationalized overnight,” Fordham told CNBC’s “Street Signs” on the sidelines of the Milken Institute Asia Summit in Singapore.

North Korea carried out its sixth and most powerful nuclear test on Sept. 3, worsening already fraught U.S.-North Korea relations. In response, the United Nations Security Council voted to intensify sanctions, including imposing a limit on oil imports, against the hermit state.

While the duration and scope of such a conflict would be difficult to measure, North Korea remained an immense risk, Fordham said.

“It is the single biggest geopolitical threat and one that would also move markets … When we look at political risk, we look at whether it’s likely to cause an oil price shock or a growth shock. And in the North Korea case, if the worst were to happen, it would be both,” she added. source

Source: WWIII Fears Sparked As North Korea Fires Nuclear-Capable Missile From Pyongyang Into Japanese Air Space • Now The End Begins

President Trump Says ‘Major, Major Conflict Possible’ With North Korea As Diplomacy Falters • Now The End Begins

“There is a chance that we could end up having a major, major conflict with North Korea. Absolutely,” Trump told Reuters in an Oval Office interview ahead of his 100th day in office on Saturday.

U.S. President Donald Trump said on Thursday a major conflict with North Korea is possible in the standoff over its nuclear and missile programs, but he would prefer a diplomatic outcome to the dispute

“There is a chance that we could end up having a major, major conflict with North Korea. Absolutely,” Trump told Reuters in an Oval Office interview ahead of his 100th day in office on Saturday.

Nonetheless, Trump said he wanted to peacefully resolve a crisis that has bedeviled multiple U.S. presidents, a path that he and his administration are emphasizing by preparing a variety of new economic sanctions while not taking the military option off the table.

“We’d love to solve things diplomatically but it’s very difficult,” he said.

Donald Trump: “Major, major” conflict with North Korea possible

U.S. President Donald Trump said on Thursday a major conflict with North Korea is possible in the standoff over its nuclear and missile programs, but he would prefer a diplomatic outcome to the dispute. Rough Cut (no reporter narration).

In other highlights of the 42-minute interview, Trump was cool to speaking again with Taiwan’s president after an earlier telephone call with her angered China.

He also said he wants South Korea to pay the cost of the U.S. THAAD anti-missile defense system, which he estimated at $1 billion, and intends to renegotiate or terminate a U.S. free trade pact with South Korea because of a deep trade deficit with Seoul.

Asked when he would announce his intention to renegotiate the pact, Trump said: “Very soon. I’m announcing it now.”

Trump also said he was considering adding stops to Israel and Saudi Arabia to a Europe trip next month, emphasizing that he wanted to see an Israeli-Palestinian peace. He complained that Saudi Arabia was not paying its fair share for U.S. defense.

XI ‘TRYING VERY HARD’

Trump said North Korea was his biggest global challenge. He lavished praise on Chinese President Xi Jinping for Chinese assistance in trying to rein in Pyongyang. The two leaders met in Florida earlier this month.

“I believe he is trying very hard. He certainly doesn’t want to see turmoil and death. He doesn’t want to see it. He is a good man. He is a very good man and I got to know him very well.

“With that being said, he loves China and he loves the people of China. I know he would like to be able to do something, perhaps it’s possible that he can’t,” Trump said.

Trump spoke just a day after he and his top national security advisers briefed U.S. lawmakers on the North Korean threat and one day before Secretary of State Rex Tillerson will press the United Nations Security Council on sanctions to further isolate Pyongyang over its nuclear and missile programs.

The Trump administration on Wednesday declared North Korea “an urgent national security threat and top foreign policy priority.” It said it was focusing on economic and diplomatic pressure, including Chinese cooperation in containing its defiant neighbor and ally, and remained open to negotiations.

U.S. officials said military strikes remained an option but played down the prospect, though the administration has sent an aircraft carrier and a nuclear-powered submarine to the region in a show of force.

Any direct U.S. military action would run the risk of massive North Korean retaliation and huge casualties in Japan and South Korea and among U.S. forces in both countries.

‘I HOPE HE’S RATIONAL’

Trump, asked if he considered North Korean leader Kim Jong Un to be rational, said he was operating from the assumption that he is rational. He noted that Kim had taken over his country at an early age.

“He’s 27 years old. His father dies, took over a regime. So say what you want but that is not easy, especially at that age.

“I’m not giving him credit or not giving him credit, I’m just saying that’s a very hard thing to do. As to whether or not he’s rational, I have no opinion on it. I hope he’s rational,” he said. source

 

‘Source: President Trump Says ‘Major, Major Conflict Possible’ With North Korea As Diplomacy Falters • Now The End Begins

Japan Moves To Highest Threat Level As North Korea Says Strike On US Military Bases Coming • Now The End Begins

Nuclear-armed North Korea said Tuesday its missile launches were training for a strike on US bases in Japan, as global condemnation of the regime swelled.

Three of the four missiles fired Monday came down provocatively close to US ally Japan, in waters that are part of its exclusive economic zone, representing a challenge to US President Donald Trump.

In separate phone calls, Trump — whose rhetoric on the campaign trail had raised doubts about the issue — reaffirmed Washington’s “ironclad commitment” to Japan and South Korea. The US will demonstrate to Pyongyang that there were “very dire consequences” for its actions, the White House said in a statement.

Source: Japan Moves To Highest Threat Level As North Korea Says Strike On US Military Bases Coming • Now The End Begins