WAS JESUS’ LAST SUPPER A SEDER?

Jonathan Klawans • 10/18/2012
Excerpted from the last sub-topic:
HISTORICAL DOUBTS ABOUT JESUS’ LAST SUPPER AS A PASSOVER SEDER
History, however, is often more complex and perhaps a little less comforting than we might hope. Although I welcome the current ecumenical climate, I believe we must be careful not to let our emotions get the better of us when we are searching for history. Indeed, even though the association of the Last Supper with a Passover Seder remains entrenched in the popular mind, a growing number of scholars are beginning to express serious doubts about this claim.

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A San Francisco seder. California Rabbi Jack Frankel and his family lift the first glass of wine during a Seder meal, held on the first night of Passover (and the second night in the Diaspora). The Seder commemorates the Exodus from Egypt. Throughout the meal, the biblical story is retold; the food is linked symbolically with the Exodus.
Photo by Rodger Ressmeyer, San Francisco/Corbis.

Of course a number of New Testament scholars—the Jesus Seminar comes to mind—tend to doubt that the Gospels accurately record very much at all about Jesus, with the exception of some of his sayings. Obviously if the Gospels cannot be trusted, then we have no reason to assume that there ever was a Last Supper at all. And if there was no Last Supper, then it could not have taken place on Passover.2
The sacrifice of the Passover lamb is conducted annually on Mt. Gerizim, in Nablus (ancient Shechem), in the West Bank, by the Samaritans, a religious group that split from Judaism by the second century B.C.E. The Samaritans retained the Torah (the Five Books of Moses) as their Scripture, although with some alterations. The Samaritan Bible refers to Mt. Gerizim, not Jerusalem, as the center of worship. David Harris.
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Furthermore, several Judaic studies scholars—Jacob Neusner is a leading example—very much doubt that rabbinic texts can be used in historical reconstructions of the time of Jesus. But rabbinic literature is our main source of information about what Jews might have done during their Seder meal in ancient times. For reasons that are not entirely clear, other ancient Jewish sources, such as Josephus and Philo, focus on what Jews did in the Temple when the Passover sacrifice was offered, rather than on what they did afterward, when they actually ate the sacrifice. Again, if we cannot know how Jews celebrated Passover at the time of Jesus, then we have to plead ignorance, and we would therefore be unable to answer our question.
There is something to be said for these skeptical positions, but I am not such a skeptic. I want to operate here under the opposite assumptions: that the Gospels can tell us about the historical Jesus,3 and that rabbinic sources can be used—with caution—to reconstruct what Jews at the time of Jesus might have believed and practiced.4 Even so, I do not think the Last Supper was a Passover Seder.
Here is the link to the complete article:
http://www.biblicalarchaeology.org/daily/people-cultures-in-the-bible/jesus-historical-jesus/was-jesus-last-supper-a-seder/?mqsc=E3771070&utm_source=WhatCountsEmail&utm_medium=BHD+Daily%20Newsletter&utm_campaign=E4B411
And when the hour was come, he sat down, and the twelve apostles with him. And he said unto them, WITH DESIRE I HAVE DESIRED TO EAT THIS PASSOVER WITH YOU BEFORE I SUFFER: FOR I SAY UNTO YOU, I WILL NOT ANY MORE EAT THEREOF, UNTIL IT BE FULFILLED IN THE KINGDOM OF GOD. And he took the cup, and gave thanks, and said, Take this, and divide it among yourselves: For I say unto you, I will not drink of the fruit of the vine, until the kingdom of God shall come. And he took bread, and gave thanks, and brake it, and gave unto them, saying, THIS IS MY BODY WHICH IS GIVEN FOR YOU: THIS DO IN REMEMBRANCE OF ME. LIKEWISE ALSO THE CUP AFTER SUPPER, SAYING, THIS CUP IS THE NEW TESTAMENT IN MY BLOOD, WHICH IS SHED FOR YOU. [Luke 22:14-20]
By this command, the Lord Jesus changed or re-directed our focus to Him and His sacrificial death and His completed redemptive mission of His First Coming two thousand years ago. To the Jews and Jews wannabes, who refuse to acknowledge the Lord Jesus Christ, they are still commemorating the Exodus event by partaking in:
The Traditional Foods of Passover
The Passover Seder is one of the most holy meals in the Jewish religion. Learn why certain foods are required and others are forbidden.
Seder Plate
Here is an example of a traditional plate used only on Passover. From the bone at the top and counter-clockwise we explain the traditional foods.
1. Z’roa: A lamb shank represents a symbolic offering to the temple.
2. Beitzah: The egg is a symbol of rebirth.
3. Maror: Bitter herbs such as horseradish signify the bitterness of enslavement.
4. Karpas: A non-bitter vegetable, here parsley, is dipped in salted water to symbolize tears.
5. Haroset: A mixture of apple, nuts and wine that represents the mortar and bricks used by the enslaved Jews.
6. Hazeret: Another bitter herb, such as romaine lettuce. Some do not use a second bitter herb.
Source: myjewishlearning.com
Read more: http://www.rd.com/slideshows/the-traditional-foods-of-passover/#ixzz2ybE4pv00
As you can see, no reference whatsoever is made to the suffering, death, resurrection and ascension of the Lord Jesus Christ is depicted in these elements of Jewish Passover Seder.
2012-12-1 IN REMEMBRANCE OF ME
Published on Dec 21, 2012
“In Remembrance of Me”
Stand-Alone Message
Marc Schelske explains the deep and significant meaning behind communion, including it’s origins in the Seder meal.
This video is (c) 2012 Bridge City Community Church. The contents of the sermon is (c) 2012 Marc Schelske

For I have received of the Lord that which also I delivered unto you, That the Lord Jesus the same night in which he was betrayed took bread: And when he had given thanks, he brake it, and said, TAKE, EAT: THIS IS MY BODY, WHICH IS BROKEN FOR YOU: THIS DO IN REMEMBRANCE OF ME. After the same manner also he took the cup, when he had supped, saying, THIS CUP IS THE NEW TESTAMENT IN MY BLOOD: THIS DO YE, AS OFT AS YE DRINK IT, IN REMEMBRANCE OF ME. For As Often As Ye Eat This Bread, And Drink This Cup, Ye Do Shew The Lord’s Death Till He Come. Wherefore whosoever shall eat this bread, and drink this cup of the Lord, unworthily, shall be guilty of the body and blood of the Lord. But let a man examine himself, and so let him eat of that bread, and drink of that cup. For He That Eateth And Drinketh Unworthily, Eateth And Drinketh Damnation To Himself, Not Discerning The Lord’s Body. For this cause many are weak and sickly among you, and many sleep. For if we would judge ourselves, we should not be judged. But when we are judged, we are chastened of the Lord, that we should not be condemned with the world. [1Co 11:23-32]
Let us keep remembering the Lord Jesus Christ and His redemptive power. And on top of that, let us judge ourselves to make sure that we are worthy of partaking in the Lord’s Supper.
Are you saved? If not, what are you waiting for? How?
“The word is nigh thee, even in thy mouth, and in thy heart: that is, The Word Of Faith, which we preach; THAT IF THOU SHALT CONFESS WITH THY MOUTH THE LORD JESUS, AND SHALT BELIEVE IN THINE HEART THAT GOD HATH RAISED HIM FROM THE DEAD, THOU SHALT BE SAVED. FOR WITH THE HEART MAN BELIEVETH UNTO RIGHTEOUSNESS; AND WITH THE MOUTH CONFESSION IS MADE UNTO SALVATION. FOR THE SCRIPTURE SAITH, WHOSOEVER BELIEVETH ON HIM SHALL NOT BE ASHAMED. FOR THERE IS NO DIFFERENCE BETWEEN THE JEW AND THE GREEK: FOR THE SAME LORD OVER ALL IS RICH UNTO ALL THAT CALL UPON HIM. FOR WHOSOEVER SHALL CALL UPON THE NAME OF THE LORD SHALL BE SAVED.” [Romans 10:8-13]

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